Abstract Archives of the RSNA, 2011


SST11-04

Regular Fish Consumption Is Associated with Larger Gray Matter Volumes and Reduced Risk for Cognitive Decline in the Cardiovascular Health Study

Scientific Formal (Paper) Presentations

Presented on December 2, 2011
Presented as part of SST11: ISP: Neuroradiology (Cognition II)

Participants

Cyrus Raji MD, PhD, Presenter: Nothing to Disclose
Kirk Ericson PhD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Oscar Lopez MD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Lewis H. Kuller MD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Gach H. Michael PHD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Paul Thompson PhD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Mario Riverol MD, PhD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
James T. Becker PhD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose

PURPOSE

Much interest exists in examining whether fish consumption could reduce the risk for cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to determine whether consumption of certain preparations of fish were related to preserved brain gray matter volume. We also sought to understand if preservation of gray matter volume in relation to fish consumption conferred a reduced risk of cognitive impairment over 5 years.

METHOD AND MATERIALS

We selected 260 cognitively normal individuals from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) with information on fish consumption from the National Cancer Institute Food Frequency Questionaire and 3-D volumetric spoiled gradient echo MR imaging of the brain. Voxel based morphometry was used to model the relationship between fish consumption at baseline and brain structure 10 years later in multiple regression analyses. Covariates in this analysis were age, gender, race, education, white matter lesions, MRI identified infarcts, waist/hip ratio, and physical activity as assessed by the number of city blocks walked in one week. The analysis also controlled for multiple comparisons. The main effects of fish consumption on the brain were then entered into a logistic regression model to determine risk for cognitive decline. This model controlled for age, gender, education, race, and APOE4 status.

RESULTS

Consumption of baked or broiled fish at least one time per week was positively associated with gray matter volumes in the hippocampus, precuneus, posterior cingulate, and orbital frontal cortex even after adjusting for covariates in the analysis and multiple comparisons (False Discovery Rate p < .05). Greater hippocampal, orbital frontal cortex, and posterior cingulate volumes in relation to fish consumption reduced the risk for 5-year cognitive decline 5 fold (p = .02). There was no statistically significant relationship between consumption of fried fish and brain structure or cognitive decline.

CONCLUSION

Consumption of baked or boiled fish at least once per week is positively associated with brain structure and related to reduced risk for cognitive decline. While we controlled for education in this study, other lifestyle and socio-economic factors may underlie these relationships.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION

This work suggests that dietary habits may reduce risk for cognitive decline and dementia by exerting beneficial effects on brain structure.

Cite This Abstract

Raji, C, Ericson, K, Lopez, O, Kuller, L, H. Michael, G, Thompson, P, Riverol, M, Becker, J, Regular Fish Consumption Is Associated with Larger Gray Matter Volumes and Reduced Risk for Cognitive Decline in the Cardiovascular Health Study.  Radiological Society of North America 2011 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, November 26 - December 2, 2011 ,Chicago IL. http://archive.rsna.org/2011/11008757.html