Abstract Archives of the RSNA, 2008


SSJ07-02

The Introduction of a Portable Head/Neck CT Scanner May Be Associated with an 86% Increase in the Predicted Percent of Acute Stroke Patients Treatable with Thrombolytic Therapy

Scientific Papers

Presented on December 2, 2008
Presented as part of SSJ07:

Emergency Radiology (Technology/Informatics)

Participants

David Benjamin Weinreb MD, Presenter: Author, NeuroLogica Corp
James E. Stahl MD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose

PURPOSE

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recommends that all patients presenting with signs of acute stroke undergo CT imaging within 25 minutes of their arrival in the Emergency Department. The objective of the present study is to determine whether the addition of a portable CT scanner dedicated for use in the Emergency Room increases compliance with this recommendation and, furthermore, whether it would be associated with a higher percentage of patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy.

METHOD AND MATERIALS

We acquired a portable 8-slice head/neck CT scanner (CereTom, NeuroLogica, Danvers, MA) for the Emergency Department. Time elapsed from the physician’s request for STAT head CT imaging was recorded for the one-month prior to and the four-month period following the acquisition of the portable scanner. We analyzed the data with a discrete-event simulation modeling approach, in which entities (eg, patients) compete with each other for limited resources, specifically CT time.

RESULTS

Portable CT imaging was associated with a reduction from 34.55±2.2 minutes (n=127) to 15.88±2.4 minutes (n=281), or 54%, in the time elapsed from the physician’s request to when the scan was performed (p<0.001). Discrete-event simulation modeling demonstrated that the portable scanner would reduce the time from symptom onset to CT imaging from 4.16 to 3.76 hours (9.6%). Consequently, this would increase the predicted percent of patients to be treated with thrombolytic therapy within the 3 hour therapeutic window from 0.59% to 1.1% (86% increase).

CONCLUSION

Our institution’s acquisition of a portable CT scanner facilitated more rapid assessment of acute stroke patients and is anticipated to increase the number of patients for whom thrombolytic therapy can be administered.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION

Portable CT imaging may be a cost-effective approach to achieve compliance with NINDS recommendations.

Cite This Abstract

Weinreb, D, Stahl, J, The Introduction of a Portable Head/Neck CT Scanner May Be Associated with an 86% Increase in the Predicted Percent of Acute Stroke Patients Treatable with Thrombolytic Therapy.  Radiological Society of North America 2008 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, February 18 - February 20, 2008 ,Chicago IL. http://archive.rsna.org/2008/6018537.html