Abstract Archives of the RSNA, 2007


SSE01-04

Does Ethnicity Influence Women’s Preferences for Higher Recall from Screening Mammography with the Potential for Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer?

Scientific Papers

Presented on November 26, 2007
Presented as part of SSE01: Breast Imaging (Mammography)

Participants

Nazia Jafri BA, Presenter: Nothing to Disclose
Rama Ayyala BS, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Al Ozonoff PhD, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Jacqueline Jordan MBA, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose
Priscilla Jennings Slanetz MD, MPH, Abstract Co-Author: Nothing to Disclose

PURPOSE

This study prospectively surveyed underserved women to establish their preferences regarding the trade-off between recall rates and earlier detection of breast cancer.

METHOD AND MATERIALS

To date, 500 women undergoing screening mammography have completed an IRB-approved validated survey in one of three languages: English, Spanish, and Haitian-Creole. Data were analyzed across three groups: Caucasian, Black (African-American or Caribbean descent), and Hispanic, using chi-squared analysis.

RESULTS

Of 500 respondents (37% Caucasian, 42% Black, and 9% Hispanic), Caucasians had almost equal distribution among all educational levels, while Blacks and Hispanics had more representation at lower educational levels (P< 0.001). Hispanics believed mammography to be more diagnostically sensitive than it is (P< 0.0001). Caucasians were more likely to continue with screening mammography despite false-positive results, while Blacks and Hispanics were more hesitant to continue with screening (P< 0.0001). Caucasians preferred higher recall rates and were more willing to undergo subsequent invasive (P< 0.0001) and non-invasive (P= 0.002) procedures, while Blacks were more hesitant and unsure about their willingness to return.

CONCLUSION

Differences in ethnic background appear to influence women’s understanding of mammography, compliance with recall, and desire for early detection.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION

A prior study of Caucasian educated women showed preference for higher recall rates in favor of earlier detection; it is unknown whether higher recall would deter underserved women from screening.

Cite This Abstract

Jafri, N, Ayyala, R, Ozonoff, A, Jordan, J, Slanetz, P, Does Ethnicity Influence Women’s Preferences for Higher Recall from Screening Mammography with the Potential for Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer?.  Radiological Society of North America 2007 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, November 25 - November 30, 2007 ,Chicago IL. http://archive.rsna.org/2007/5004764.html